How to Tell Friends & Family You’re Bulletproof

You started the Bulletproof Diet as an experiment. From the first coffee, the impact on your performance was undeniable – at work, at home, in the gym. You lost weight and gained a new kind of steady, long-lasting energy. Now you feel amazing and you want tell everyone.

There’s only one problem …

You fear being judged and marginalized by friends, family and workmates. After all, many of these people follow the Standard American Diet (SAD) and would probably freak out if you told them about the two (or three, or four) tablespoons of butter you plop into your coffee every morning.

What if they don’t take you seriously? What if they call Bulletproof  a crazy fad, or worse, an outright fraud? What if they make a concerted effort to try to tempt you with Oreos, Doritos and kettle corn?

Our founder and CEO, Dave Asprey, often faces this same dilemma. In his opinion, the best defense is an open invitation. This is what Dave tells doubters:

“Drink Bulletproof coffee and notice how you feel. That would be a very important form of evidence.”

In other words, offer the doubters a chance to test Bulletproof themselves before they judge. Invite them to try Bulletproof Coffee. It can do more than change the conversation. It can help others change their lives.

For other ideas on how to share the Bulletproof lifestyle with family, friends and neighbors, read on:

Don’t keep it a secret

One of the main tenets of the Bulletproof Diet is that healthy fats from foods like butter, ghee and Brain Octane Oil actually help you to burn fat and boost mental and physical performance. This runs counter to the conventional opinion that fat is evil and will clog your arteries.

Trying to explain that eating fat has helped to turn your life around might seem like a mission impossible. You might think it easier to avoid confrontations with people you know and hide your Bulletproof connection.

However, research suggests that there’s a connection between positive social support and sticking to your diet.[1] So, in a way, you owe it to yourself to share your experience.

Try telling the story of how you became Bulletproof and how it’s improved your life to others. Almost all people in the Bulletproof community present with some kind of issue or problem they want to address. When others understand where you started and where you want to end up, they often turn from critics to supporters.

If you commit to transparency, you take the first step toward staying Bulletproof for the long run. This way when you gently refuse your mom’s famous tater tot casserole or the donuts your coworker left in the break room, they may understand it’s not a rejection of them, but a life choice.

Stay low-key

Instead of becoming a pushy Bulletproof evangelist, wait for people to ask questions. What’s in your mug? Have you lost weight? How do you have so much energy? If they show interest, you have the opportunity to casually talk about the changes you’ve made. Avoid getting into a debate. There is no debate. It’s your life and your choice. If you feel like you’re under attack, just smile. Thank them for their ideas and change the subject.

But sometimes you may feel you can’t avoid a sticky situation: maybe you’re headed to a family dinner, your office is taking orders for a catered lunch, or your partner wants to bake you a gluten-filled birthday cake. You still have a few easy-going options:

Remember, it’s more mainstream than ever to have dietary guidelines and follow a protocol. Take advantage.

Make it easy to understand

Share some of the great introductions to Bulletproof available for free on the Internet. Print the Bulletproof Diet Roadmap, show them the 10 Secrets to Success on the Bulletproof Diet or Dave’s video on how to make Bulletproof Coffee. You’ll help your loved ones understand the diet’s basic concepts without overwhelming them with research on why it works.

Be generous

If your loved ones want to learn more, go one step further. Lend out your copies of The Bulletproof Diet and The Better Baby Book. Cook recipes from Bulletproof: The Cookbook (like pumpkin flan or ginger-braised ribs). Let them take your blue light-blocking glasses for a spin. Schedule gym time with them and practice Bulletproof-approved exercise techniques. In this way, you may be able to cultivate a deeper conversation about why Bulletproof works and how others can try it too.

Ultimately, the best way to tell people about Bulletproof is to simply live the best life possible, according to what you find works best for you. If you can eliminate brain fog, achieve higher mental and physical performance, and just feel happier, your family and friends may want the same results. From there, it just takes an open conversation—and a good cup of coffee.

And if you’ve already gone through this process, please share your story in the comments on our Facebook page. Thanks for reading and have a wonderful day.

 

References:

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275524/

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