Video: What Happens In Your Body When You Eat Ramen And Gatorade

This is as awesome as it is gross. It’s a live video of what happens in your GI tract when you eat processed food vs. “real food.”

The idea of swallowing a camera has been around for a long time, but the increasingly low cost of sensors makes video like this so insanely available.

I swallowed my first biohacker electronics in 1997. It was a TENS unit I ordered from Russia, designed to use electrical pulses to stimulate the growth and healing of the GI tract. It was mildly annoying to feel an electrical tingle every couple seconds for 8 hours as it made its way through my gut…until the little metal pill ran past my siatic nerve. For an excruciating 15 minutes, my entire left leg would kick and hurt every 5 seconds. Fodder for comedy some day, perhaps.

Anyway, spend 4 minutes watching the video below from TEDx Manhattan, and learn why you should eat real food!

What Happens In Your Body When You Eat Ramen And Gatorade.

You may also like

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Dave Asprey

Statements made on this website have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Information provided by this website or this company is not a substitute for individual medical advice. Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.