Embrace Criticism and Don’t Take Yes for An Answer – Steven Herz with Dave Asprey – #745

Dave Asprey
Steven Herz
Learn how you can develop your authority, warmth, and energy. Asking for super honest feedback about your skills and performance will help get you there.

In this episode of Bulletproof Radio, my guest is career advisor Steve Herz. He leads a large sports and entertainment talent and marketing firm, and helps athletes, CEOs, lawyers, entrepreneurs and young professionals move forward in their careers.

According to Steve, our longing for human connection reflects an important truth—we respond more positively to people who have the ability to make a deep human connection with us. That “connectability,” as he calls it, is imperative to our personal career success—whether you’re looking for work, worried about keeping your job during a recession, or trying to climb your way to the top when things start looking up.

“I say don’t take yes for an answer because so often in life, you think you’re hearing, yes, and then six months later, you’re on the wrong end of a downsizing or a reorg and you’re out of a job or someone else gets a promotion,” Steve says. “Well, if you were so great and everything was so, ‘Yes.’ Why aren’t you where you want to be in life?”

And that’s why he called his new book “Don’t Take Yes for an Answer: Using Authority, Warmth, and Energy to Get Exceptional Results.”

Steve gives also gives solid tips on how to develop your own A.W.E.: authority, warmth and energy. Those are the components of what you should be looking to improve once you don’t take yes for an answer.

We also get into why constructive criticism can move your career forward in big ways.

“If I realized that as the employee, that I’m increasing my value to you or to the world in terms of more customers, better getting along with colleagues, better leadership, fellowship, whatever it might be, I’m helping myself,” Steve says. “So you should be thinking about that (constructive) criticism as a gift and also take it selfishly.”

Steve is president of the Montag Group in NYC, an agency that represents over 250 of today’s top journalists, broadcast executives, and media personalities—at networks like CBS, CNN, MSNBC, FOX News, ESPN and elsewhere.

After his advice in this episode, you’ll be ready to crush it at whatever personal or professional step you take next.

Enjoy! And get more resources at Dave.Asprey/podcasts.

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The-Gift-of-Criticism-Why-“Yes”-is-Holding-You-Back-–-Steven-Herz-with-Dave-Asprey-–-745

Follow Along with the Transcript

The Gift of Criticism- Why “Yes” is Holding You Back – Steven Herz with Dave Asprey – #745

Links/Resources

Websitestevenherz.com
Facebook: facebook.com/StevenHerz66/
Twittertwitter.com/stevenherz
Instagraminstagram.com/steveherz66/
Book:Don’t Take Yes for an Answer: Using Authority, Warmth, and Energy to Get Exceptional Results

Key Notes

  • Three factors Steven why I say don’t take yes for an answer because so often in life, you think you’re hearing, yes. – 3:30
  • To change your mindset and to start looking at the to use your term “negative review” as a gift. – 7:30
  • My book is about this AWE, A-W-E, authority, warmth, energy. – 13:34
  • The most important word, believe it or not in that title is, Take. Because there’s something called the give and the take, right? – 17:46
  • You can get that feedback from your bosses. You can also get feedback from your colleagues. – 21:47
  • We have these Erikson’s stages of adult development. And it’s pretty common when you’re working with someone who’s under 25, their prefrontal cortex isn’t all the way really laid in yet, – 27:48
  • Do you change the feedback tone based on where people are in their stages of life?– 28:57
  • If your volume is rising at times, it’s lowering at times, this is unpredictability to your cadence, there’s a lyrical quality to your communication. – 38:02
  • How you present an idea, it matters cause otherwise your idea will never be born. – 42:34
  • 85% of your success is based on not how you are the technical part of your job – 44:32

If you like today’s episode, check us out on Apple Podcasts at Bulletproof.com/apple and leave us a (hopefully) 5-star rating and a creative review.

Go check out my new book Super Human: The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever and also “Game Changers“, “Headstrong” and “The Bulletproof Diet” on Amazon and consider leaving a review!

Want to help others reach their full potential? Check out the incredible Human Potential Coach Training program I set up with Dr. Mark Atkinson.

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